CFP: Women and the Arts in Historical Perspective

The West of England and South Wales Women’s History Network 23rd Annual Conference

Women and the Arts in Historical Perspective

Saturday 18 June 2016

Keynote Lecture:

Rebecca D’Monte, University of the West of England, Bristol

‘War Stories: Female Literary Responses to the Two World Wars’

Papers are invited on any aspect of women’s involvement in the ‘Arts’ and/or on the gendered issues that arise from this. For this conference the ‘Arts’ are broadly defined to include, for example: painting, design, sculpture, theatre, poetry and creative writing.

Papers might include women’s role as directors, collectors and financial supporters as well as their activities as performers and authors.

Proposals are welcome on any historical period and country.

Proposals of not more than 500 words should be sent to June.Hannam@uwe.ac.uk by Monday 21st March 2016.

For further information about the conference contact Katherine.Holden@uwe.ac.uk or June.Hannam@uwe.ac.uk, or visit the conference website https://weswwhnconf16.wordpress.com/

A PDF copy of the call for papers is available here.

The Ursula Masson Memorial Lecture 2016

The Centre for Gender Studies in Wales invites you to:

The Ursula Masson Memorial Lecture 2016

Dr Kirsti Bohata (Associate Professor, Swansea University)

‘Industrial Fiction by Women Writers in Wales, 1880-1914’

Tuesday 8 March (for International Women’s Day) at 6.00-9.00pm

Ty Crawshay, Treforest Campus, University of South Wales

The lecture will take place in the Moot Court, TC13, at 6pm to be followed by a wine reception and buffet in TC30 (the Zobole Room) and the university museum’s art gallery space, Oriel y Bont, from 7.15pm.

Dr Kirsti Bohata is Associate Professor of English Literature and Director of CREW, the Centre for Research into the English Literature and Language of Wales, at Swansea University.

The lecture focuses on industrial fictions by women writers in Wales. Fictional representations of the heavy industries are scarce before the twentieth century, but there is a distinctive body of writing by Welsh women that does engage with industrial life.  These novels portray injuries and colliery disasters, disability and care, strikes and class conflict, as well as recurring themes of  nationalism and cross-class fraternity.

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