The Future of Art History in Wales: A free roundtable discussion

2017 Conference, Events, News

THE FUTURE OF ART HISTORY IN WALES
A free roundtable discussion
 
The Drwm, National Library of Wales
12 September 2017, 5-6.30pm
 
Followed by a wine reception at Aberystwyth School of Art

Cliciwch yma am raglen Cymraeg.

In 2016, the successful campaign to stop A-level Art History being dropped demonstrated the enthusiasm for art history among students, artists and educators across the UK. Yet the future of art history in all its forms – whether in schools, universities, libraries, galleries, arts centres or community groups – remains uncertain.

If, as the artist Jeremy Deller has argued, ‘Art history is the study of power, politics, identity and humanity’, the study and appreciation of art is more vital than ever in the tumultuous 21st century. In Wales, art history is inextricably linked with the political: the lack of critical attention has led to Welsh artists being marginalised or excluded from the canon altogether. How can art history in Wales work to recover movements, groups, individuals or works that have been lost? How can it consider, contextualise and celebrate Wales’s rich and diverse art history, bringing it to new audiences? What are the shared experiences with other humanities subjects (such as literary studies), and what can these disciplines learn from each other?

Join us for a free roundtable discussion with leading artists, curators and historians to discuss the future of Welsh art history/art history in Wales.

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THE URSULA MASSON MEMORIAL LECTURE 2017

Events, News

The Centre for Gender Studies in Wales
invites you to:

THE URSULA MASSON MEMORIAL LECTURE 2017

Dr. Sian Rhiannon Williams
‘“Delicate” and “troublous” questions: women teachers, gender issues and local education politics in south Wales, 1908-1928’

Wednesday 8 March (for International Women’s Day) at 6.00-9.00pm,

Ty Crawshay, Treforest Campus, University of South Wales

The lecture will take place in the Moot Court, TC13, at 6pm to be followed by a wine reception and buffet in TC30 (the Zobole Room) and the university museum’s art gallery space, Oriel y Bont, from 7.15pm.

CFP: Women and the Labour Movement in Britain from 1880 to 1950

CFPs

West of England and South Wales Women’s History Network, held in conjunction with Llafur (The Welsh People’s History Society)

24th Annual Conference

Saturday 1st July 2017
10.am to 5.pm
Aberdare, South Wales

Papers are invited on any aspect of women’s involvement in the labour movement in Britain 1880-1950. A regional focus, in particular on South Wales and the West of England, would be very welcome, although not essential.

Keynote Speakers

Stephanie Ward, Cardiff University will speak on emotions and working class women’s political activism

Karen Hunt, Keele University, will speak on labour and the housewife

Themes/ topics could include:

  • Organising separately (LP women’s sections)
  • Emotions and labour politics
  • Women’s Cooperative Guild
  • The Labour Party and the ‘housewife’
  • Organising in the community
  • Women and the labour/socialist press
  • Campaigning issues Individual women as activists and elected office holders

Proposals for 20 minute papers of not more than 500 words should be sent to

June.Hannam@uwe.ac.uk by 14 April 2017

CFP Wales and the World: Re-Framing the Literature of Wales in an International Context

CFPs, Events

Wales and the World:
Re-Framing the Literature of Wales in an International Context

The Twenty-Eighth Annual Conference of the Association for Welsh Writing in English
Friday 1st April – Sunday 3rd April 2016
Gregynog Hall, Newtown

Call for Papers
Wales has a distinctive national culture. The 2011 Census, however, indicated that the Welsh, like other British nationals, were becoming more culturally diverse. This is not surprising: the effects of the World imposing itself on Wales – industrialisation in the nineteenth century, for example – are continuous and impact profoundly on its literature.

Simultaneously, the Welsh have reached outwards beyond the confines of their homeland: as explorers and travellers, in Africa and South America for instance. Wales, too, ‘sells’ itself through ‘exported’ literature and the arts: the Dylan Thomas centenary celebrations in 2015 provided a timely reminder of a national literature that is inter-national, not only within the U.K. but further afield in Europe and across the globe.