CFP: Women and the Arts in Historical Perspective

The West of England and South Wales Women’s History Network 23rd Annual Conference

Women and the Arts in Historical Perspective

Saturday 18 June 2016

Keynote Lecture:

Rebecca D’Monte, University of the West of England, Bristol

‘War Stories: Female Literary Responses to the Two World Wars’

Papers are invited on any aspect of women’s involvement in the ‘Arts’ and/or on the gendered issues that arise from this. For this conference the ‘Arts’ are broadly defined to include, for example: painting, design, sculpture, theatre, poetry and creative writing.

Papers might include women’s role as directors, collectors and financial supporters as well as their activities as performers and authors.

Proposals are welcome on any historical period and country.

Proposals of not more than 500 words should be sent to June.Hannam@uwe.ac.uk by Monday 21st March 2016.

For further information about the conference contact Katherine.Holden@uwe.ac.uk or June.Hannam@uwe.ac.uk, or visit the conference website https://weswwhnconf16.wordpress.com/

A PDF copy of the call for papers is available here.

CFP New Work in Modernist Studies

CALL FOR PAPERS
New Work in Modernist Studies
Saturday 5 December 2015, 10am-5.30pm,
University of Exeter, Streatham Campus, Queen’s Building

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The fifth one-day Graduate Conference on New Work in Modernist Studies will take place at the University of Exeter (Streatham campus), in conjunction with Modernist Network Cymru (MONC), the London Modernism Seminar, the Scottish Network of Modernist Studies, the Northern Modernism Seminar, and the British Association for Modernist Studies (BAMS).

As in previous years, this conference will take the form of an interdisciplinary programme reflecting the full diversity of current graduate work in modernist studies; it encourages contributions both from those already involved in the existing networks and from students new to modernist students who are eager to share their work. The day will close with a plenary lecture by Professor Simon Shaw-Miller, Chair in the History of Art, University of Bristol, and author of Eye hEar: The Visual in Music (Ashgate 2013), Visible Deeds in Music: Art and Music from Wagner to Cage (Yale, 2002, second ed. 2004) and numerous essays and articles on art and music in the modern period, including ‘Modernist Music’ in the Oxford Handbook of Modernisms (Oxford, 2010).

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CFP David Jones: Dialogues with the Past

David Jones: Dialogues with the Past

An International, Interdisciplinary Conference at the University of York

21-23 July, 2016

 

Call for Papers

In ‘Past and Present’ (1953), David Jones claimed:  ‘The entire past is at the poet’s disposal’. The interweaving of this ‘entire past’ with the present moment fundamentally characterises Jones’s art and thought, from his visual reimagining of historical figures, to the etymologically rich allusions of his poetry, to the unusual philosophy of history manifested in his essays and letters. The analysis of Jones’s visual or poetic works often reflects the act of excavation: the unique layering of images, words and ideas, the resonant symbolism and shades of meaning. the blending of cultural traditions and dynamic interweaving of whole civilisations.

As 2016 marks the centenary of the Battle of the Somme which profoundly shaped Jones’s imagination and thought, it provides an ideal moment to reconsider the entirety of Jones’s engagement with the many, various, elusive and intertwined ‘pasts’ through which he conceived history and culture. It will be an opportunity to explore Jones’s own style, subject matter, allusive practice and intellectual questions including the role of ‘memory’, ‘inheritance’ and ‘history’ in art and life, while also reflecting upon Jones’s own past and contemporary moment.

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CFP Wales and the World: Re-Framing the Literature of Wales in an International Context

Wales and the World:
Re-Framing the Literature of Wales in an International Context

The Twenty-Eighth Annual Conference of the Association for Welsh Writing in English
Friday 1st April – Sunday 3rd April 2016
Gregynog Hall, Newtown

Call for Papers
Wales has a distinctive national culture. The 2011 Census, however, indicated that the Welsh, like other British nationals, were becoming more culturally diverse. This is not surprising: the effects of the World imposing itself on Wales – industrialisation in the nineteenth century, for example – are continuous and impact profoundly on its literature.

Simultaneously, the Welsh have reached outwards beyond the confines of their homeland: as explorers and travellers, in Africa and South America for instance. Wales, too, ‘sells’ itself through ‘exported’ literature and the arts: the Dylan Thomas centenary celebrations in 2015 provided a timely reminder of a national literature that is inter-national, not only within the U.K. but further afield in Europe and across the globe.

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CFP International Conference on Welsh Studies 2016

North American Association for the Study of Welsh Culture and History (NAASWCH)
International Conference on Welsh Studies

Harvard University
20-22 July 2016

The NAASWCH Program Committee seeks diverse perspectives on all aspects of Wales and Welsh culture – as well as proposals focused on the Welsh in North America – from many disciplines, including history, literature, languages, art, social sciences, political science, philosophy, music, and religion. NAASWCH invites participation from academics, postgraduate/graduate students and independent scholars from North America, the United Kingdom, and elsewhere.

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CFP A Century On: Modernist Studies in Wales, The Inaugural Modernist Network Cymru Conference

We are delighted to launch the call for papers for our inaugural conference, to be held at Swansea University on Monday 7 September 2015. Please click here to download an ENGLISH or a WELSH copy of the CFP.

 

A Century On: Modernist Studies in Wales

The Inaugural Modernist Network Cymru Conference

Swansea University, Monday 7 September 2015
 Keynote speaker: Professor Angharad Price (Bangor University)

The 2010s have been a busy decade for modernist scholars. In 2010, the inaugural BAMS conference considered Virginia Woolf’s (in)famous assertion that ‘On or about December 1910, human character changed’; in 2013, BBC Radio 3 ran a series of programmes celebrating Paris’ annus mirabilis, exemplified by the 1913 premiere of Stravinsky’s Rite of Spring; and in 2014 we celebrated Dylan Thomas’ birth in a year-long series of events.

Now, in 2015, as we mark 100 years since Caradoc Evans’ landmark short story collection, My People, it seems a good time to stop and take stock of the past, present and future of both modernism and modernist studies as a discipline.

This inaugural conference, to be held at Swansea University, invites scholars from Wales and beyond to reflect upon modernism and its legacies. As the first Modernist Network Cymru (MONC) event, it aims to showcase the range and diversity of research into modernism happening in Wales today. MONC brings together scholars and professionals working on modernism in Wales to encourage collaboration and communication; as such, we welcome interdisciplinary proposals on any aspect of modernism, as defined in the widest sense. We particularly welcome scholars working on Welsh modernist writers and artists, as well as modernist art and writing in Wales.

Possible topics could include but are not limited to:

  • Networks of modernist activity
  • Local modernisms
  • Welsh modernism
  • Geographies or topographies of modernism
  • Modernism and identity
  • Modernism and periodization
  • Chronologies and genealogies of modernism
  • Contemporary modernisms and neomodernisms
  • Centenaries and memorialisation
  • Definitions and theories of modernism
  • Modernist studies and interdisciplinarity
  • The future of modernist studies
  • Individual modernist theorists and practitioners in Wales and beyond

The event will also be an opportunity for participants to collaborate with us on setting the agenda and scope for future MONC activity and events.

Proposals for papers (20 minutes) should include a summary of the proposed paper (300 words), the speaker’s contact details, and a short bio (100 words).

Proposals should be sent to modernistnetworkcymru@gmail.com by 14 June 2015.
For more information and enquiries, please visit modernistnetworkcymru.org.

Conference organising team:

Elaine Cabuts (Aberystwyth University)

Elizabeth English (Cardiff Metropolitan University)

John Goodby (Swansea University)

Diana Wallace (University of South Wales)

Emma West (Cardiff University)

This conference is kindly supported by the Learned Society of Wales and the Research Institute for Arts and Humanities, Swansea University.

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CFP: Local Modernisms: 1890-1950

Although not taking place in Wales, the following may be of interest to MONC members:

Local Modernisms: 1890-1950
Centre for the Study of Cultural Modernity,
University of Birmingham, 22-23 June 2015

CFP Deadline: 18 May

Modernism – cosmopolitan and international in its connections and networks – found its home in cities, regions and locales. And yet provincialism and localism are still dirty words in criticism surrounding literary and artistic responses to modernity: they remain tinged with the reactionary and the conservative. Many narratives of artistic culture of the period 1890-1950 maintain that advanced aesthetics move from core to province, losing vitality as they become part of a supposedly ‘middlebrow’ culture. But what if the current were reversed? What if the local, the regional, the provincial, the civic and the municipal were the sites of artistic energy rather than cultural backwaters? Terms such as ‘local’ and ‘regional’ have more recently been animated by the reaction against financial and consumerist globalisation, but a glance backwards reveals that artists and writers of the modernist period were engaging with ideas of the local too, and that many of them were located far away from the metropolitan ‘centre’.

This two-day conference on 22nd-23rd June 2015, hosted by the Centre for the Study of Cultural Modernity at the University of Birmingham, invites academics, postgraduate students, curators and other arts and heritage professionals to come together to discuss the many ways in which our current literary and artistic maps of modernism might be redrawn so that proper attention can be paid to local cultural nodes and networks. The organisers are looking for papers on any aspect of the topic. Potential speakers might talk about such issues as the following:

  • Literary and artistic responses to civic, local, municipal, regional and provincial modernity
  • Local, civic, municipal and regional activities, groups, coteries and enclaves
  • Rural modernisms
  • The concept of the ‘region’
  • Rejections/reformulations of internationalism
  • Town planning and urban design
  • Public art
  • Contemporary re-imaginings/re-workings of the spaces and places of civic modernity

Papers should be 20 minutes long. For further information about the conference, or to submit an individual or panel proposal, contact Dr Daniel Moore (d.t.moore@bham.ac.uk). The deadline for proposals is Monday 18th May.

https://localmodernisms.wordpress.com/